Learn How To Build A Strong, Attractive Planter Box For Your Child Get the Children's Garden Planter Box eBook

15 Woodworking Tools That You Can Use In The Garden [Buying Guide]


Notice: Undefined index: HTTP_USER_AGENT in /home/tranq082/public_html/wp-content/plugins/social-warfare/lib/utilities/SWP_CURL.php on line 49

Notice: Undefined index: HTTP_USER_AGENT in /home/tranq082/public_html/wp-content/plugins/social-warfare/lib/utilities/SWP_CURL.php on line 49

Notice: Undefined index: HTTP_USER_AGENT in /home/tranq082/public_html/wp-content/plugins/social-warfare/lib/utilities/SWP_CURL.php on line 49

Supplement your garden tools by including some woodworking tools. Learn which tools you can use and how you can use them.

 

15 Woodworking Tools That You Can Use In The Garden [Buying Guide]

This is a bonus post to the series on gardening tools I wrote a while ago.

For the other posts in the series (these will open in a new tab or window so you can continue reading this article):

The idea from this post came to me as I drilled holes and cut a piece of PVC pipe to upgrade my strawberry crate tower as a watering pipe to get water to each tier of the tower. I used:

  • a hacksaw to cut the pipe to length
  • a drill and a drill bit to drill holes in the pipe to let the water trickle out
  • vice grips to snap off some of the webbing at the bottom of the intermediate crates to allow the pipe through

Traditional woodworking tools, both manual and power tools, can be used in the garden for many tasks. They may already be tools you have in your garage or workshop, so you are repurposing them for the garden. Or you might buy some of these tools for the garden and then use them for projects around the house.

Either way adding to your tool collection is always a good thing!

I am a participant in the Amazon Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon and affiliated sites. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Power Tools

Safety Note: Before using any power tool, make sure you have read the manual that comes with the tool and make sure you are comfortable working with it. Safety equipment such as safety glasses or googles, hearing protection, dust masks and gloves should be worn. DO NOT take any risks and make sure you are not tired or under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Accidents can happen so quickly.

Mitre Saw

You don’t absolutely need this tool, but it is a nice-to-have.

If you are building some type of garden structure or just need a board cut shorter for some reason, this is the easiest way to do so and will save you quite a bit of time. The mitre saw will also come in handy for other DIY projects around the house.

A compound sliding mitre saw is the best long-term investment, although they are more expensive than standard non-sliding saws. A sliding mitre saw will allow you to cut wider boards such as 2×6’s at 45° or 2×8’s at 90°. But for most homeowners and gardeners it is overkill.

Drill

If you need a hole somewhere, you need a drill with appropriate sized drill bits. The drill can also be used to screw together things if you add in some drill bits.

I prefer a corded drill for most work. I simply have a long extension cord that reaches most parts of my garden or I bring the work to the garage if I can.

A cordless drill is great for the occasional smaller drilled hole and for driving screws. You do need to make sure you have a charged up spare battery for bigger jobs.

For drilling into concrete or brick, a more heavy-duty hammer drill is a good investment, along with appropriate drilling bits. If you can afford only one drill, then go with this one and use a long extension cord. I would not advise getting a heavy-duty drill that runs on batteries.

 

Reciprocating Saw

This is a handy tool for pruning trees, as long as you make sure the blade is clean if you are using the saw for other purposes. With the thin blade you are able to easily work between branches where a larger bowsaw for instance won’t fit.

You can then also use it to cut medium thickness branches to length to burn in a woodstove or fireplace.

With the right blades it can also be used to cut metal. Very handy for demolition work if you are removing an old wooden garden structure such as a deck or pergola, as it lets you cut through rusted nails and other fasteners as well as the wood. Or to cut rebar to length for strengthening concrete work you might be doing.

Rotary Tool

This is a nice-to-have. The most common brand is Dremel although you can get rotary tools from other manufacturers.

Get a good assortment of attachments, so that you can drill, cut, grind, sand, etc. Accessory kits are good, but you might not need everything in the kit, so you can buy accessories individually.

There are many projects you can do with the help of a rotary tool.

The tool especially works great in the garden to sharpen tools with an appropriate grinding wheel. Or to take the burrs off a piece of metal or plastic pipe that you have cut.

Definitely get a cordless version that runs on a battery. Much more convenient in the garden. Just remember to charge up the battery!

Safety Note: Because these are high-speed rotary tools, make sure to wear safety glasses or goggles. And be careful if cutting or grinding metal as there will be lots of sparks. Ensure you don’t set fire to dry mulch or nearby wood!

Hand Tools

You may already have these tools, but if not I’ve provided links for good quality tools that will last a long time and of course can be used in the house or workshop as well.

Measuring Tape

Needless to say this is for measuring anything in the garden. Maybe you need to check to see if a new structure will fit in a space, measure your zucchini that you missed picking and is now baseball bat sized or find out what size a container is to ensure a plant will have enough space for it’s roots.

It’s best to get a longer tape and put up with a bit more bulk as outdoor spaces are so much larger.

However if you really want to measure long distances in your garden on a regular basis you may need a longer, wind-up reel.

Level

A level lets you make sure a surface is level horizontally or absolutely straight vertically.

Use it to check if a container is level so that when you water the water doesn’t spill over the edge. A shorter level is usually better here.

Use it with a straight edge to let you find out the slope of the land, perhaps to check drainage or to add stairs. No need to get a longer level for the odd occasions you need a longer one.

A string level also comes in handy for really long distances.

 

Carpenter’s Pencil

A carpenter’s pencil is more robust than a regular pencil, making it much better for marking cut lines on wood and other rough surfaces such as concrete or brick.

The only downside of such a pencil is sharpening it. You can use a utility knife to sharpen it, but it is a bit crude to do it that way. Therefore get yourself a sharpener as well to make it easier.

Supplement your garden tools by including some woodworking tools. Learn which tools you can use and how you can use them.

Clamps

There are so many different types of clamps on the market.

The most versatile ones are the spring clamps and you can get them in an assortment of sizes.

You can use them to clamp row covers onto supports, hold plants to stakes and act as a temporary third hand while you drill holes or put in screws to secure something.

Hammer/Mallet

A rubber or wood mallet is handy to knock wood or bamboo stakes into the ground. There is less of a chance of damaging the stake than using a metal hammer.

 A hammer will let you knock a metal stake or rebar into the ground. And of course to hit a nail on the head if you are building something! The claw also comes in handing for prying things apart or removing nails. A great multi-purpose tool.

Screwdriver

I mainly use my screwdriver if I need to tighten a screw on a tool. But it also comes in handy if you need to install a screw to hang up a tool or to tie a string or net to for a trellis.

Get a good selection of bits that store in the handle.

Hacksaw

A slower version of the reciprocating saw but can be more precise. Use it to cut metal.

Wrenches and Sockets

These will come in handy to maintain your garden tools and to tighten bolts that have come loose on decks and other garden structures. Sometimes you may need both metric and imperial. So best to get a set that has both.

Wood Rasp/File

A good quality wood rasp (basically a woodworker’s file) allows you to shape wood to remove sharp edges on raised beds and file pointy ends on thin garden stakes.

A metal file will help you keep your garden tools sharp, everything from hoes to shovels and spades to axes.

Vice Grips

These come in handy whenever you have something stuck that won’t unscrew and a regular wrench doesn’t do the trick.

These can also be used as a temporary low capacity clamp.

And some come with a built-in wire cutter so that you are not tempted to use your good pruners to cut wire!

Staple Gun

This comes in handy to attach netting to wood supports for an instant trellis or to secure row cover to wood supports or directly to your raised beds. Or anytime you need to attach plastic sheeting to make or repair a greenhouse or hoop tunnel.

Conclusion

So as you can see woodworking tools do have their place in a gardener’s tool collection. Make sure to get permission from the woodworker before you borrow his/her tools, otherwise you might get into trouble. And clean off any dirt before returning them!

Or better yet, build your own woodworking tool kit for use exclusively in the garden to keep the peace.

Wishing you all the best and happy woodworking gardening!


 If you enjoyed this article, have something to add or have any questions, please leave a comment below!Marc Thoma SignatureMarc ThomaTranquil Garden, Victoria, BC 

 

Supplement your garden tools by including some woodworking tools. Learn which tools you can use and how you can use them.

Marc Thoma

Marc is the founder of Tranquil Garden. He has more than 15 years gardening experience and is working steadily towards his own tranquil garden.

Leave a Reply

×

Cart